Preface to fables essay

THE MINDE OF
THE FRONTISPEECE
And Argument of this
WORKE. FIRE, AIRE, EARTH, WATER, all the Opposites
That stroue in Chaos , powrefull LOVE vnites;
And from their Discord drew this Harmonie,
Which smiles in Nature : who, with rauisht eye,
Affects his owne made Beauties. But, our Will,
Desire
, and Powres Irascible , the skill
Of PALLAS orders; who the Mind attires
With all Heroick Vertues : This aspires
To Fame and Glorie ; by her noble Guide
Eternized, and well-nigh Deifi'd.
But who forsake that faire Intelligence,
To follow Passion , and voluptuous Sense ;
That shun the Path and Toyles of HERCVLES;
Such, charm'd by CIRCE's luxurie, and ease,
Themselues deforme: 'twixt whom, so great an ods;
That these are held for Beasts, and those for Gods.

PHOEBVS APOLLO (sacred Poesy)
Thus taught: for in these ancient Fables lie
The mysteries of all Philosophie.

There were later three notable collections of fables in verse, among which the most influential was Gabriele Faerno 's Centum Fabulae (1564). The majority of the hundred fables there are Aesop's but there are also humorous tales such as The drowned woman and her husband (41) and The miller, his son and the donkey (100). In the same year that Faerno was published in Italy, Hieronymus Osius brought out a collection of 294 fables titled Fabulae Aesopi carmine elegiaco redditae in Germany. [16] This too contained some from elsewhere, such as The Dog in the Manger (67). Then in 1604 the Austrian Pantaleon Weiss, known as Pantaleon Candidus , published Centum et Quinquaginta Fabulae . [17] The 152 poems there were grouped by subject, with sometimes more than one devoted to the same fable, although presenting alternative versions of it, as in the case of The Hawk and the Nightingale (133-5). It also includes the earliest instance of The Lion, the Bear and the Fox (60) in a language other than Greek.

But though the imagination cannot supply the place of real memory, it has the wild faculty of counterfeiting memory. It dreams of persons it never knew, and talks to them as if it remembered them as old acquaintance. It relates circumstances that never happened, and tells them as if they had happened. It goes to places that never existed, and knows where all the streets and houses are, as if we had been there before. The scenes it creates are often as scenes remembered. It will sometimes act a dream within a dream, and, in the delusion of dreaming, tell a dream it never dreamed, and tell it as if it was from memory. It may also be remarked, that the imagination in a dream has no idea of time, as tune. It counts only by circumstances; and if a succession of circumstances pass in a dream that would require a great length of time to accomplish them, it will appear to the dreamer that a length of time equal thereto has passed also.

Preface to fables essay

preface to fables essay

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